Archive for the ‘glass manufacturing’ Category

Requests For and About Glass Reflect Industry Changes

January 7, 2015

Since our website  uses the name “Glass Factory Directory of North America,” we regularly get requests for information on glass products and glass resources. Here are a few that came to us recently by telephone and email:

From a company that uses glass tiles to make large commercial mosaics, asking who would be interested in their waste glass (cullet).  We emailed a university “materials science” contact in their state, who referred the inquiry on to the university hot-glass shop, and we referred the mosaic company to the  “Glass Organizations on the Internet” page on our website link to the Glass Art Society, where they can find glass artists who might be interested.

From a volunteer guide at the Corning Museum of Glass, asking how many glass industry manufacturers still exist in the U.S.  We checked the numbers in our 2014 Glass Factory Directory, and sent them an estimate. 

From a glass studio which had been using Fenton Art Glass cullet and was looking for new sources.  We sent them the very short list of U.S. “hand glass” manufacturers who still do “pressed and blown” colored glass items, and the link from our website to the Glass Art Society for glass color providers.

A request looking for a glass container supplier who could make small amounts of specially designed glass containers.  In our reply we explained how quickly modern glass container factories produce quantities of glass containers as a way for them to understand why factories have high minimum order requirements. (Great video of glass container manufacturing!)  We answer similar questions on a regular basis.

From a winery on the West Coast with an idea for using recycled glass bottles to make new glass bottles in an on-site furnace, looking for a glass engineering firm to make it happen. We’ll keep you posted.

A request for a source to make very large glass containers which could be autoclaved.  We directed them  to the American Scientific Glassblowers Society link on our “Glass Organizations on the Internet” website page, they can recommend members who will do this.

And, from someone who wanted to find our 2014 Glass Factory Directory on-line (for free). We replied that we sell the Directory online, it is not available online.  We do sell print, .pdf and electronic database editions, and a business we work with makes maps of glass plant locations.

 

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Can U.S. Glass Manufacturing “Come Back?”

February 5, 2014

In “The Myth of Industrial Rebound” in the New York Times Opinion pages (1/26/14) Steven Rattner notes that U.S. state, local and federal governments are all promoting the return of manufacturing jobs, but the possibility of rebuilding America’s manufacturing industries is not able to bring back manufacturing jobs at what union wages used to be.

“. . .we need to get real about the so-called renaissance, which has in reality been a trickle of jobs, often dependent on huge public subsidies.  Most important, in order to compete with China and other low-wage countries, these new jobs offer less in health care, pension and benefits than industrial workers historically received.”

I joined the staff of National Glass Budget in 1979.  As editor, I was responsible for not only the monthly magazine (later called ‘Glass News’) but also in charge of publishing the annual Glass Factory Directory.  The Directory, which began in 1912, is a reference to glass plant locations in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.  When I started working at the National Glass Budget, we were one of three monthly glass manufacturing magazines, each with its own particular annual glass directory.  All three magazines are gone, only our Glass Factory Directory continues to be published.

I started visiting glass manufacturing locations within a year of starting work at National Glass Budget.  Early on,  I  realized that glass plants in the U.S. and Canada were closing.  I remember the plants I have visited over the years, too many names to mention, most of them no longer operating.  After each plant closed there was a time, in the 80s and 90s, when the glass plants and their equipment were still in the communities where people who had worked there lived.  However, the machinery from many U.S. and Canadian glass plants has been disassembled and sold and shipped overseas to be used in other glass manufacturing businesses.

In our 2013 Directory a number of small hand glass plants from previous editions are gone. These plants are no longer producing glass because they do not have the orders to keep employees working.  Often these plants keep a demonstration glass operation running as a tourist attraction, and they sell the inventory from the former manufacturing operation in a company store.

One of the most valuable characteristics of glass containers and so many decorative or useful glass products is the attractive appearance of glass items.  We often get calls from businesses interested in making a new glass product in a U.S. plant, or making it possible for them to make more products in the U.S. since their current U.S. manufacturer can not meet the growing need for their product.  They are  surprised that the plants which might have handled this additional production are already out of business.

When businesses ask me where the glass plants are which could make glass for them, I tell them that the number of glass plants in our Glass Factory Directory of North America today is about 25% of those which were operating and listed in the Directory when I first became the managing editor.  The number of engineering firms who can build and repair and improve glass melting facilities has also dropped, because there are fewer North American glass manufacturing plants to work with, and the competition to build and plants outside North America is fierce.  The number of recruiting firms who have provided glass plant managers, forming foremen and finishing workers for glass manufacturers is down as well.  The thousands of employees of glass plants in North America a few decades ago have retired, or relocated, or found another way to support their families.  If it were possible to build more glass manufacturing plants, new workers to operate the plants would have to be trained.

More than 10 years ago I got a call from a company which had been making its glass housewares outside the U.S.   I  look at glass items I see in department stores and gift stores to see where they are made, and so I knew that this company was not manufacturing in U.S. plants.  When I returned the call, one of the managers of this company talked to me about their interest in moving the manufacturing of their glass products to the U.S.  It was my job to tell him that there were very few glass plants still operating that could make the products the company sold.  When he asked me why there were so few, I told him that many glass plants which might have been able to make his company’s products had closed because they didn’t have enough customers to continue in business.  I continue to get several calls like this each year.

The U.S. government is interested in supporting manufacturing in the U.S. and creating more manufacturing jobs.   What I know is that since the glass machinery and glass manufacturing workers and their expertise is gone, it will not be possible to bring glass manufacturing in the U.S. anytime soon.  Glass manufacturing is one of several manufacturing industries which have seriously declined in the last 30 years, and it is impossible to bring them back.

posted Febuary 5, 2014

Glass Factory Featured – and the 2013 Glass Factory Directory is here!

October 22, 2013

Willow Glass, a thin flexible glass material, was featured in the “All Tech Considered” 10/21/2013 segment of NPR’s “All Things Considered” broadcast. Willow Glass is related to “Gorilla Glass” (both made at Corning’s Harrodsburg, Ky. plant). Willow Glass will be introduced as the protection for faceplates of smart phones, tablets and other electronic devices later this year.

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The 2013 Glass Factory Directory of North America is now available, as a .pdf, in a print edition or as an electronic data base.  The Directory is updated annually.  More information is available at: www.glassfactorydirectory.com

U.S. Glass Industry Changes

August 6, 2013

A former customer of Peltier Glass, which closed in 2010 wrote us recently to ask where to find a replacement for a product she had regularly bought from Peltier.  For many years we would refer pressed and blown glass customers to the Society for Glass Sciences and Practices website, maintained by the West Virginia University College of Engineering and Mineral Resources.  Before I wrote to back to the customer, I checked to see if the SGSP site was still up, but it is not.

Back in the late 1970s Hope Gas supported the formation of the Society for Glass Science and Practices, and the last SGSP meeting at the traditional site, the Oglebay Resort and Conference Center, was in 2010.  Most of the “hand glass” manufacturers have closed their glass plants, and their suppliers, who helped support the meeting, are working with customers in other areas of glass, or have also closed.  We are updating the Glass Factory Directory of North America now, and the “Pressed and Blown” section in the 2013 edition will be very small.

The gazing balls made by one of the traditional “pressed and blown” companies (Punxsutawney Glass and Tile) bought by the “opalescent glass” manufacturer Youghiogheny Glass several years ago were mentioned in a recent New York Magazine article about the artist Jeff Koons and his use of gazing balls in his sculptures. Punxsutawney Glass is located in the Pennsylvania town famous for Punxsutawney Phil, a groundhog who may see his shadow on February 2 and so predict six more weeks of winter.

L. David Pye,  Dean and Professor of Glass Science, Emeritus, the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University, was the featured speaker at this summer’s International Glass Congress July 1-5, 2013 in Prague, Czech Republic, presenting the plenary talk “Glass and The Nanotechnology Paradigm.” Dr. Pye has previously served as past President of the International Commission on Glass and the American Ceramic Society, and has been instrumental in the education of many of today’s glass scientists and ceramic engineers.

Whole Foods uses strengthening process to make glass jars safer

November 23, 2012

Whole Foods likes to sell products in glass packaging, and wanted to be sure they could give their customers products in containers which met safety standards.  They partnered with Santanoni Glass & Ceramics which will be doing additional strengthening on all of the jars Whole Food uses and will be testing the temper characteristics of jars from various manufacturers. They will do consecutive drop tests at increasing heights to determine the break point. Santanoni Glass will be using their Hercuglass patented process for ultra break-resistant glass.

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A designer glass “Homune” table recently featured in the New York Times T Magazine was designed by Michael Young for the Czech glass company Lasvit.  The amber-colored glass base was assembled from pieces cast in steel molds, and the top is clear hand-blown crystal.

 

The Market for Strong Glass Grows

March 31, 2011

The strong “Chemcor” glass developed at Corning almost 50 years ago is now sold as “Gorilla Glass” for use as screens on personal electronic devices using touch screen technology.

Today this glass is made by Corning using a fusion-draw process  in Harrodsburg, Ky., and is an alumino-silicate glass, not the everyday soda-lime glass.  In the fusion-draw process hot glass is pumped into a suspended trough and allowed it to overflow and run down either side. The glass flows then meet under the trough and fuse seamlessly into a smooth, hanging sheet of glass.  Fusion-draw glass is tempered in a chemical bath, and does not use heat-tempering as many sheet glasses do.  The resulting liquid-crystal glass can be made very thin and is very strong.  More than 100-plus handheld devices use this glass.

Gorilla Glass LCD television screens will be available from some manufacturers this year.  Sony showed Bravia  model televisions with these screens at the 2011 Consumer Electronic Show in January.  With production going full-tilt in Harrodsburg, Ky., Corning  is converting part of a second factory in Shizuoka, Japan, to fill the growing orders.